Compliance Countdown

Within 6 Months

 July 3, 2022
Australia: General Aviation Maintenance

The general aviation industry in Australia has been asking for several years for less complex maintenance rules that reduce costs. This includes finalizing a revised Part 43 governing aircraft in private and aerial work operations. The objective is to base the new rules on U.S. FAR Part 43. The proposal is intended to simplify compliance, provide business opportunities, and reduce red tape for private and aerial work operators. While Part 43 will provide additional flexibility for the private GA sector the regulation does not change the more-stringent maintenance requirements for aircraft used for air taxi operations, even if only occasionally. Comments are due July 3, 2022.

 July 4, 2022
Australia: Twin Engine Rotorcraft Ratings

Australia's Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) has proposed a solution to the lack of specific aircraft class ratings for single-pilot, less complex multi-engine helicopters. The current approach to prescribe a type rating for each multi-engine helicopter is a key reason for the limited availability of suitably qualified flight instructors, flight examiners, and operators to conduct training and assessments for some multi-engine helicopters. “This has led to increased costs and time to access training and assessment, and impacts on the availability of suitably qualified pilots.” The problem is exacerbated by the very small number of these types of helicopters in Australia. To alleviate the problem, CASA has proposed a temporary exemption to establish a multi-engine helicopter class rating until the flight crew licensing rules are formally amended. The exemption is scheduled to be in place by the end of July 2022. Comments on the proposed exemption are due July 4, 2022.

 July 8, 2022
Australia: Air Traffic Controllers

Part 172 of Australia's civil aviation regulation (CAR), pertaining to air traffic services and controllers, has been amended several times, but this is the first comprehensive review of both the regulation and its manual of standards. Proposed amendments include: introducing requirements covering controller fatigue, setting requirements for an accountable manager and key personnel, simplify the hierarchical structure for the various standards to which a controller must comply, and rearrange the layout of Part 172 to match the layout of other new CARs. Comments are due July 8, 2022.

 July 18, 2022
U.S.: Chicago O'Hare ATC Procedures

The public is being asked to comment on an FAA draft environmental assessment (EA) on proposed revised ATC procedures and other developments for Chicago O’Hare International Airport. The FAA is proposing to permanently implement a 2.5-degree offset (angled) approach procedures at O'Hare for Runways 10R/28L that were temporarily approved in 2015. With 3,100 feet separating Runways 10R/28L and the adjacent parallel Runways 10C/28C, the final approaches to 10R and 28L must be offset from their extended centerline to allow independent simultaneous approaches to 10R and 10C, or to 28L and 28C under current operating rules. In addition to the amended approach procedures, the EA considers future developments at O'Hare from 2023 through 2032, including terminal projects, on-airport hotels, airfield and taxiway improvements, and support facilities. Comments on the draft EA are due by July 18. The FAA also will hold two public meetings in early July.

 July 25, 2022
EASA: SST Environmental Rules

This advance notice of proposed amendment (A-NPA) provides initial concepts for the development of environmental protection requirements for the new generation of supersonic transports (SST) being developed for business jet and airline applications. These aircraft are expected to become operational in the late 2020s. The objective of the rulemaking is to ensure that landing and takeoff noise limits correspond to existing requirements for subsonic jet airplanes. Requirements for CO2 limits for SSTs are also being proposed. Comments on the A-NPA are due July 25, 2022.

 August 8, 2022
Europe: Remote Airport ATS

This Notice of Proposed Amendment (NPA) from EASA addresses the evolving technological, procedural, and operational aspects of remote airport air traffic services, with the aim of facilitating its safe and uniform implementation by EASA member states and promoting the development and deployment of new digital technologies. Remote provision of air traffic services, referred to as digital towers, enables ATS from airports where direct visual observation is not available. Instead, the view of the entire airport is through digital technology. Comments on the NPA are due Aug. 8, 2022.

 August 11, 2022
EASA: Rotorcraft Health Monitoring

This Notice of Proposed Amendment (NPA) will enable the use of vibration health monitoring (VHM) systems to be a more integral part of the continued airworthiness regime of Part 29 large rotorcraft. The NPA will also ensure that better and updated guidance is provided for the design as well as the routine and effective in-service use of these systems. This will allow VHM systems to aid in reducing the risk for errors or oversights in the maintenance of rotor and rotor drive units. “Current acceptable means of compliance are not sufficient to ensure that VHM systems can be used to optimize maintenance interventions for certain rotorcraft,” EASA said. Comments are due by Aug. 11, 2022.

 September 16, 2022
U.S.: Remote ID of Unmanned Aircraft

New FAR Part 89 requires that after Sept. 16, 2022, no unmanned aircraft can be produced without FAA-approved remote identification capability. After Sept. 16, 2023, no unmanned aircraft can be operated unless it is equipped with remote ID capability as described in Part 89 or is transmitting ADS-B Out under Part 91. A person operating an unmanned aircraft without remote identification must always operate within visual line of sight and in an approved FAA-recognized identification area. On Sept. 16, 2022, the FAA will begin accepting applications from listed types of organizations for FAA-recognized identification areas.

 June 23, 2022 and September 21, 2022 and August 1, 2023
U.S.: Maintenance Schools

As part of an interim final rule overhauling aviation maintenance technician schools regulations (Parts 65 and 147), the FAA is transitioning from using the mechanic practical test standards (PTS) as the testing standard to obtaining a mechanic certificate. As a part of this transition, the FAA developed the mechanic airman certification standards (ACS), which adds task-specific knowledge and risk management elements, “resulting in a comprehensive presentation that integrates the standards for what an applicant must demonstrate to pass the written, oral, and practical tests for a certificate or rating,” said the agency. To allow for each school to train its students under the curriculum aligned with the ACS, the FAA will use the PTS as the testing standard until July 31, 2023. Starting Aug. 1, 2023, the FAA will use the ACS to conduct mechanic certification tests. With the exception of the PTS to ACS transition period, this rule is effective on September 21, 2022.  Comments on the interim rule are being elicited through June 23, 2022.

 September 30, 2022
Europe: Passenger Entry Requirements

New passenger reporting requirements by the European Union Aviation Safety Agency apply to entry into European Union countries of non-EASA charter flights and professional-piloted Part 91 operations, but do not apply to individuals who own and pilot their own aircraft into the EU. The system will register owner-pilot and passenger name, type of travel documents (visa or passport), biometric data (fingerprints and facial images), and the date and place of entry and exit.

 October 31, 2022
EASA: Reduced Fuel Loads

The European Union Aviation Safety Agency has published rules that permit operators to reduce the amount of contingency fuel carried, thereby reducing the CO2 emissions and the overall environmental impact of the flight. While the rules recognize that extra fuel needs to be carried to account for unexpected situations that delay or prevent landing at the originally flight planned airport, EASA says that “The amount of additional fuel required can be optimized, while continuing to ensure high safety levels, due to improved risk assessment, calculations based on better data, and better decision making.” The new requirements are scheduled to go into effect on Oct. 31, 2022.

 November 13, 2022
Australia: Airport Certification

Revised Australian airport certification regulations (CASR Part 139) and an accompanying revised manual of standards (MOS) went into effect on Aug. 13, 2020. Under a transition period, operators of certified airports have until Nov. 13, 2022, to comply with the requirements and MOS publications, including developing an airport operations manual.

 December 12, 2022
Canada: Duty/Rest Regulations

Revisions to duty time and rest regulations for Canadian-registered commuter and air taxi operators of turbine and non-turbine aircraft (CAR Parts 704 and 703) go into effect on Dec. 12, 2022. Transport Canada said the changes include: prescribed flight and duty time limits that respect modern scientific research and international standards to limit the amount of time a crewmember can be on the job; and fatigue risk-management systems that will require operators to demonstrate that any variance to the prescribed flight and duty time limits will not adversely affect the level of flight crew fatigue or alertness.

Within 12 Months

 December 31, 2022
New Zealand: ADS-B Out Mandate

Covid-19 pandemic implications have prompted New Zealand to extend its ADS-B Out compliance date for one year from the previous deadline of Dec. 31, 2021. The ADS-B provisions, already mandatory for aircraft flying above 24,500 feet, will apply in the rest of New Zealand’s controlled airspace by Dec. 31, 2022. Financial support to help aircraft owners equip with ADS-B avionics is available on a first-come, first-served basis, with up to $2,500 for ADS-B Out and an additional $500 for ADS-B in.

 December 31, 2022
Mexico: CVRs and FDRs

Cockpit voice and flight data equipment requirements for commercial turbine aircraft operations (including air taxis) that were adopted in 2011 by Mexico’s aviation authority will become effective and go into force incrementally from Dec. 31, 2020, through Dec. 31, 2022, based on the number of aircraft in an operators fleet. Generally, the rules apply to turbine airplanes with 10 or more passenger seats and large turbine helicopters flying in Mexico airspace under an international air operator certificate.

 January 1, 2023
Aircraft CO2 Emissions Standards

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's CO2 aircraft emissions standards apply to new design applications made on or after Jan. 1, 2023 for jets with a mtow of 133,000 pounds or less and have 19 or fewer passenger seats. The standards also apply to new deliveries of in-production large jets starting Jan. 1, 2028. Jets with mtow under 12,566 pounds, turboprops below 19,000 pounds mtow, and piston-engine airplanes are exempt.

 January 1, 2023
U.S.: Aircraft CO2 Emissions Standards

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's CO2 aircraft emissions standards apply to new design applications made on or after Jan. 1, 2023 for jets with a mtow of 133,000 pounds or less and have 19 or fewer passenger seats. The standards also apply to new deliveries of in-production large jets starting Jan. 1, 2028. Jets with mtow under 12,566 pounds, turboprops below 19,000 pounds mtow, and piston-engine airplanes are exempt.

 February 23, 2023
Canada: ADS-B Out Mandate

Compliance with ADS-B Out equipment and operating requirements is planned to become mandatory in the country’s Class A and B airspace beginning Feb. 23, 2023. To demonstrate compliance with the mandate, aircraft must be equipped with an appropriate transponder with ADS-B out capabilities, meet the applicable minimum operational performance standards, and have antenna capability for broadcast toward space-based ADS-B receivers emitting 1090 MHz extended squitter. This latter requirement can be met either through antenna diversity (the use of a top and bottom antenna) or with a single antenna that is capable of transmitting both towards the ground and up towards satellites.

 June 1, 2023
Africa: ADS-B Mandate

ADS-B will go fully operational on a voluntary basis for one year starting on May 19, 2022 across all six of the flight information regions (FIRs) controlled by the Agency for Aerial Navigation Safety in Africa and Madagascar (ASECNA). Ops Group reports that ADS-B use will become mandatory in these FIRs starting June 1, 2023. Based in Dakar, Senegal, ASECNA has published separate notams for each of the FIRs, that together cover 16.2 million square miles of airspace, but all contain essentially the same information.

 June 2, 2023
U.S.: Aircraft Fueling

The National Fire Prevention Association (NFPA) is granting a 24-month extension to the compliance deadline of its standards that call for airport fueling vehicle loading racks to be equipped with automatic shutoff devices that are compatible with fueling trucks. This extension to June 2, 2023, applies only to airports that adopted the 2022 revision of NFPA 407. The original compliance date of June 2, 2021, still applies for airports operating under the 2017 revision. The National Air Transportation Association (NATA) is working with the FAA as to how the extension will affect current enforcement policy at Part 139 certificated airports.

 June 7, 2023
Europe: ADS-B out Mandate

The ADS-B Out requirement in Europe is Dec. 7, 2020, for aircraft receiving their certificate of airworthiness (C of A) on or after December 7. Aircraft that obtained their C of A between June 6, 1995, and Dec. 7, 2020, must arrange for retrofits to meet the ADS-B Out mandate by June 7, 2023. Both deadlines apply only to aircraft with an mtow exceeding 5,700 kg (12,566 pounds) or having a maximum cruising true airspeed capability greater than 250 knots. Aircraft with a C of A dated before June 6, 1995 are exempt from European ADS-B requirements.

 June 12, 2023 and September 9, 2024
U.S.: Pilot Records Database

By June 12, 2023, operators under Parts 91, 91K, and 135 must complete submissions of reports to the pilot records database (PRD) of all historical records concerning training, alcohol testing, qualification, proficiency, and disciplinary actions dating on or after Jan. 1, 2015. Final compliance date for reporting historical records that date before Jan. 1, 2015, is Sept. 9, 2024. Also beginning on Sept. 9, 2024, the Pilot Records Improvement Act ceases to be effective and will not be an available alternative to PRD for operators, entities, or trustees to which these regulations apply.

Beyond 12 Months

 June 23, 2022 and September 21, 2022 and August 1, 2023
U.S.: Maintenance Schools

As part of an interim final rule overhauling aviation maintenance technician schools regulations (Parts 65 and 147), the FAA is transitioning from using the mechanic practical test standards (PTS) as the testing standard to obtaining a mechanic certificate. As a part of this transition, the FAA developed the mechanic airman certification standards (ACS), which adds task-specific knowledge and risk management elements, “resulting in a comprehensive presentation that integrates the standards for what an applicant must demonstrate to pass the written, oral, and practical tests for a certificate or rating,” said the agency. To allow for each school to train its students under the curriculum aligned with the ACS, the FAA will use the PTS as the testing standard until July 31, 2023. Starting Aug. 1, 2023, the FAA will use the ACS to conduct mechanic certification tests. With the exception of the PTS to ACS transition period, this rule is effective on September 21, 2022.  Comments on the interim rule are being elicited through June 23, 2022.

 August 1, 2023
U.S.: Mechanic Certification Tests

The FAA is transitioning from using the mechanic practical test standards (PTS) as the testing standard to obtaining a mechanic certificate. As a part of this transition, the FAA has developed mechanic airman certification standards (ACS), which add task-specific knowledge and risk management elements, resulting in a comprehensive presentation that integrates the standards for what an applicant must demonstrate to pass the written, oral, and practical tests for a certificate or rating said the agency. To allow time for each school to train its students under the curriculum aligned with the ACS, the FAA will use the PTS as the testing standard until July 31, 2023. Starting Aug. 1, 2023, the FAA will use the ACS to conduct mechanic certification tests.

 September 16, 2023
U.S.: Remote ID of Unmanned Aircraft

New FAR Part 89 requires that after Sept. 16, 2023, no unmanned aircraft can be operated unless it is equipped with remote identification capability or is transmitting ADS-B Out under Part 91. A person operating an unmanned aircraft without remote identification must always operate within visual line of sight and in an approved FAA-recognized identification area. Part 89 describes the types of organizations that can apply for an FAA-recognized identification area.

 June 12, 2023 and September 9, 2024
U.S.: Pilot Records Database

By June 12, 2023, operators under Parts 91, 91K, and 135 must complete submissions of reports to the pilot records database (PRD) of all historical records concerning training, alcohol testing, qualification, proficiency, and disciplinary actions dating on or after Jan. 1, 2015. Final compliance date for reporting historical records that date before Jan. 1, 2015, is Sept. 9, 2024. Also beginning on Sept. 9, 2024, the Pilot Records Improvement Act ceases to be effective and will not be an available alternative to PRD for operators, entities, or trustees to which these regulations apply.